Tag Archives: buying a home

7 tips for moving in to your new home

You’ve sealed the deal, inked the contract and are about to move into your new home at last. But before you take a breather, there’s still plenty to do – some of it is the fun part (furnishings) and some of it is necessary administration tasks. Each of those can be done in a finance-friendly way though.

Here are our top tips for moving in to your new home, and how you could make the most of your finances.

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How to make mortgage lenders love you

How to get a mortgage

One of the first steps to getting a mortgage is to impress the lender with your credibility. So here are a few simple steps to financially prepare yourself to help you get the mortgage you want.

In 2014 the Financial Policy Committee (FPC) said that only 15% of all new mortgage lending offered by banks and building societies could be more than 4.5 times a person’s income. Currently, mortgages of more than 4.5 times the borrower’s income is around 10% of lending.

So, if you want to be in the 15% of high loan-to-income applications, you’ll probably need to have:

  • A good deposit
  • A steady income
  • Little debt
  • A good credit score

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7 tips for first time home buyers

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Buying your first home can seem at times like climbing a particularly steep hill - daunting, confusing and with several pitfalls along the way.  Prices are still rising, with the average UK first-time buyer home now costing £184,973, 7% up on that of a year ago1.

And finding the money for a deposit without help from the Bank Of Mum And Dad can be a real challenge – the typical first-time buyer deposit is now £33,222 - that’s 133% of an average salary1. The average first-time buyer borrowed 3.49 times their income, and the average first-time buyer loan was an estimated £136,0001.

But with a few simple steps to prepare yourself financially, and make lenders see you in a positive light, you could approach buying your first home with a lot more confidence.

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14 new Garden Villages to be built across the UK

Garden Villages to be builtWe now know where the 14 new ‘Garden Villages’  - new towns to help solve the housing crisis – will be. Their locations range from Cumbria to Cornwall.

Government ministers have backed plans for a brand new wave of ‘garden villages’ with between 1,500 and 10,000 new homes, in an effort to confront the growing lack of good housing stock.

Here’s where they are:

Long Marston (Stratford-on-Avon)
Oxfordshire Cotswold (west Oxfordshire)
Deenethorpe (east Northamptonshire)
Culm  (Devon)
Welborne (Hampshire)
West Carclaze (Cornwall)
Dunton Hills (Essex)
Spitalgate Heath (Lincolnshire)
Halsnead (Merseyside)
Longcross (Runnymede and Surrey Heath)
Bailrigg (Lancaster)
Infinity Garden Village (south Derbyshire)
St Cuthberts (near Carlisle)
North Cheshire (Cheshire)

Each village will include green spaces, good links to public transport and a wide mix of house prices, including affordable homes. Continue reading

How to make your dream home a reality

Britain has enjoyed a number of property booms over the past 20 years. And despite the fact that property prices have also tumbled on a number of occasions, the average house price has risen significantly. 

According to the Nationwide House Price Index, the average UK house price went up from £54,008 at the end of Q3 1996 to £206,346 at the end of Q3 2016 – a whopping 282 per cent increase.

Unfortunately, rising house prices has meant that it has become harder for first-time buyers to get a foot onto the property ladder. Using the average house price as a guide, even if a mortgage has a 95 per cent loan-to-value, buyers would still need to find a deposit of over £10,000. Add in solicitor and estate agent fees and the initial layout can seem daunting.

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Brexit: What’s the latest, and how does the interest rate cut affect homeowners?

brexit-interest-rate2After the political whirlwind of the last couple of months, it appears the country’s immediate future may be becoming a little clearer.

Now that Theresa May has taken office as Prime Minister, she will agree the government’s negotiating position before she triggers Article 50, and officially starts the clock on the UK’s exit from the EU.

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Why choose Shared Ownership?

The home ownership dream can seem more out of reach than ever, with mortgage affordability rules making the home-buying process more complicated. And ever-increasing house prices mean that many hopeful homeowners usually have to find larger deposits than before.

According to the Nationwide House Price Index, the average UK property price in October 2015 was £196,807 – up from £173,678 in October 2013 (a rise of 13.3 per cent). On a mortgage that offers 90 per cent loan-to-value (LTV), this means finding a deposit of nearly £20,000, with estate agent and legal fees on top of that too.

More information: What type of mortgages should I get?

So what for the hopeful at the foot of the property ladder? One potential solution is part-own, part-buy – Shared Ownership. A step that yours truly took a few years back and have never regretted.

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5 ways the cost of living has changed since 1966

UK Bobby Moore World Cup postage stampHas ‘fifty years of hurt’ come by already? Saturday 30 July marks the fiftieth anniversary of English football’s finest moment, when they thought it was all over (and it was) and England’s XI won the World Cup for the first and only time with a 4-2 win over West Germany at a sun-drenched Wembley Stadium.

We thought it would be interesting to look at five ways the cost of living may have changed since 1966 – in real terms – which brought up some surprises.

1.       Buying a house – In 1966 the average cost of a house was £3,620, which equates to about £60,848 in today’s money. In contrast, the average cost of a house in the UK broke the £200,000 barrier for the first time in April 2016, going up to £313,000 in the south of England.   Continue reading

Changes in home ownership through the generations

Getting on the property ladder is a lot different to how it used to be. If we compare the home ownership status of young people today to the older generation – the results show a stark difference.  Check out our Mortgage Application Guide for more information about the mortgage process.

changes in home ownership

Where will you retire to?

It used to be that the retirement dream was to leave the city and head for the seaside – if not the year-round sun of the south of Spain, then perhaps the clean air of the British coast.

But could it be that the emergence of the ‘Smarties’ – Senior Market Town Retirees – is set to change that?

retired-couple-in park-300These tend to be couples and singles aged 65-plus, who have chosen to move to green and pleasant market towns for their retirement . Places with a thriving community of all ages, small enough to have a ‘villagey’ feel but large enough to have all the regular amenities and social needs that they would be used to.

“Old age and retirement used to be a more homogenous group,” explained Richard Jenkings from Experian.

“In the past people would go on holiday to the seaside and then a lucky few would then retire to those same resorts. Today we still see this happening, but a rising trend is for better-off retirees to move not to the traditional sea-side resorts, but instead to pleasant, often historic, cathedral cities and quality market towns. Continue reading