Tag Archives: cut shopping costs

How could recent inflation rises affect us?

Small changes to the things we do on a regular basis can help cut down costs Did you know inflation in the UK reached a two-year high in December 2016? We look at how this could affect all of us.

With the weaker pound pushing up air fares and food prices, the cost of weekly shopping and jaunts abroad is on the up, not matter what your budget.

The  Office For National Statistics estimates that a basket of goods and services that cost £100 in December 2015 would have cost £101.60 in December 2016.  They put the rise down to “Price movements for the majority of the broad groups of goods and services.”

*Did you know: the most recent figures show that in 2014 the average food shop was £58.80, which would have meant an extra 50p a week in 2016 with these rises.* Continue reading

Plan your shopping budget for winter

Sometimes just making small changes to the things we do on a regular basis can help cut down the cost of our weekly food shop.

Small changes to the things we do on a regular basis can help cut down costs

Small changes to the things we do on a regular basis can help cut down costs

With winter on the way, reducing what we have going out can help us make the best of what we have coming in. Especially when January can sometimes be a challenge, if like many people, you were paid earlier than usual in December and have a much longer run until the next payday.

Here are five simple tips for a food shopping budget in winter:

  1. Plan ahead and budget – It could be something as simple as making a shopping list, so as not to overbuy at the supermarket, or it could be comparing prices in shops, across websites and with available discounts before you make a large purchase or sign up to a utility. And keeping up to date with when your credit bills are due can help you avoid the risk of missing payments. Continue reading

Contactless payments: Older shoppers take the lead

contactless-payment-300Contactless card spending is on the up – and the grey pound is the engine behind it. Spending money with contactless payments topped £1.5bn in a month for the first time in March, with one in seven card transactions now contactless compared to one in 16 a year ago. 

The figures are also more than double those in August 2015 when we last featured contactless payments on this blog.

Experts put it down to older shoppers catching up with young people, with research from Barclaycard finding that the number of ‘tap and go’ payments made by those 60 or over has increased by 116% over the past year.

The 18-24 age group has seen a 49% rise, while among 26-45 year olds it has gone up 65% – however in the 46-60 year old age group, the number using contactless payments has increased by 97%.

The figures arguably that the older generation are increasingly turning to faster, easier (no need to tap in numbers) and arguably more secure contactless payments rather than cash.

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A Bag Don’t Come For Free

platsic-bag-fruit-300Yes, it’s now 5p for a ‘free’ bag! As you may know, from Monday 5 October that’s how much it’s likely to cost you for a single-use carrier bag at the supermarket.

It’s been in force for some time in the rest of the UK, but a change in the law in England now means that any shop that employs over 250 people full-time nationwide has to charge 5p for one of those plastic carrier bags – the ones many of us take for granted we’ll be given free.  Smaller businesses won’t be obliged to do so, but will be encouraged to start their own system for charging for bags. Continue reading

7 ways good planning could help you cut costs

Small changes to the things we do on a regular basis can help cut down costs

Small changes to the things we do on a regular basis can help cut down costs

Most of us want to try to make the best use of what we have coming in by reducing what we have going out.

It doesn’t have to be formally ‘saving money’, but sometimes just making small changes to the things we do on a regular basis can help cut down the cost of our weekly shop.

Continue reading