Tag Archives: financial education

How to budget for the year ahead

The monthly financesTo get 2017 off to a bright new start and set yourself some achievable financial goals, we asked some of our favourite finance and budgeting bloggers to tell us their best tips for how to budget for the year ahead.

Francesca from the super From Pennies To Pounds blog said: “Make sure you allow yourself some wriggle room in your budget for some fun things as this will make you much more likely to stick to your budget.” 

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The best financial advice I heard in 2016

financial planningThere’s nothing quite like the end of the year for taking stock of your finances, and budgeting for the year ahead.

So to help us out, we asked some of our favourite finance and budgeting bloggers to tell us the best financial advice they’d had this year.

Cass from family blog Diary Of A Frugal Family told us: “This year I’ve found out that changing energy suppliers is so much easier than I thought it would be. 

I’d been putting it off for ages because I thought it would involve lots of time and energy for not very much return but it took me a total of about 10 minutes and I saved enough each month for a treat takeaway. ;-)” 

Nicola, who runs budgeting blog The Frugal Cottage, has this to say: “When you invest, you are always going to take a risk. However, if you’re in it for the long term, then ignore the ups and downs that happen daily and enjoy the ride.”

And Francesca From Pennies To Pounds told us she’d learned this year that: “You can only squeeze so much out of your budget – earning more money should be one of the key focuses when you are paying off debt or working towards a financial goal.” Continue reading

Jangle wins ‘Best Family App’ at #LBPawards2016

Jangle - LBP awards 2016We’re thrilled to announce that Jangle, Experian’s free children’s app, has won a Platinum award for ‘Best Family App’ at the 2016 LovedByParents (LBP) awards.

It also won a silver award for ‘Best Children’s App’ too.

LovedByParents is a parenting website offering news, pregnancy and parenting advice, articles, reviews and competitions, and their annual awards comprise several categories from travel accessories to feeding products.

What is Jangle?
Recognising the importance of helping children learn essential money management skills early in life, Experian and consumer champion and BBC ‘Dragon’ Sarah Willingham have partnered to develop Jangle, a free app which has been quality marked by pfeg (part of Young Enterprise).

Jangle is a great new and free app for children aged 7-11, that teaches children money skills in a fun and easy way while helping them save for the things they want.

It’s easy to use, and contains a wide range of exciting activities that you and your children can choose to do in order for them to learn about money, save money, and have a lot of fun in the process  – from baking cakes to planning journeys, from planning a party to hunting for bargains.

You can find out more about Jangle here, and you can download the Jangle app for iPad here.

Are you confident about teaching your child how to manage money?

Managing money well is a skill we all want our children to pick up, and in the same way that ‘charity begins at home’, so can financial management.

Research by Experian* has revealed that most (58%) parents are trying to take an active role teaching their children how to manage money well.


Video with Sarah Willingham: How do you teach children the value of money?

Over half (51%) of parents who give pocket money do so to help their children learn how to manage money independently. However, their good intentions are being undermined by a number of factors.

•              67% do not take a consistent approach in ensuring their children earn their pocket money; only ‘sometimes’ aligning it to doing chores.

•              42% of those surveyed (parents of children aged between 5-18years) admitted they did not try or were not managing to take as active a role as they would like

•              Of these parents, 36% struggled to find the time to take a more active role

•              A further 30% cite a lack of confidence, knowledge or suitable resources as factors that are holding them back.

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Should children ‘learn to earn’ their pocket money?

Did you do the odd chore to earn your pocket money when you were younger? 

DESIGN-418-pocket-money-600Sarah Willingham, consumer champion, mum of four and BBC Dragon has called for British parents to rethink how they give pocket money to their children with Experian research finding that 85% of British children that receive pocket money don’t always have to earn it.[1]

Sarah told us: “Pocket money is often the first experience children have of managing money, and I’d like us, as parents, to take a more active role in teaching our kids the importance of earning their pocket money and saving for the things they’d like. Continue reading

What age do children develop their attitudes to money?

children-age-7-money-400Although financial education became a compulsory part of the secondary-school curriculum in England in 2014, some pupils are still missing out, particularly in primary schools.

University of Cambridge research, commissioned by the Money Advice Service, shows that by the age of seven children have developed their attitudes and values towards money – and these are likely to stay with them for life. Continue reading

Positive influence from parents leads to good financial habits

Parents often wonder exasperatedly if their offspring ever listen to their advice – but it appears that today’s young adults have learnt from the experiences of their elders when it comes to their finances.

Experian’s Millennial Me & My Money report found that 45% of Millennials – that’s 18-34 year olds – manage to save at least a quarter of their disposable income each month, compared to just a third (34%) of 35-55-year-olds (widely known as Generation X).

Millennial-Me-and-My-Money-Report_FINAL

Millennials who believe their parents have had a positive influence on their money habits have almost double the savings of those who say their parents had a negative influence.

See the full illustration of the Millennial Me findings here

However, those who say their parents have had a negative influence on their money management are more than twice as likely to have missed an agreed credit repayment, twice as likely to have been refused credit, and twice as likely to have run out of money before payday in the past. Continue reading

Helping children better understand the value of money

Although financial education became a compulsory part of the secondary-school curriculum in England in 2014, some pupils are still missing out, particularly in primary schools.

Research commissioned by Money Advice Service shows that by the age of seven children have developed their attitudes and values towards money, which are likely to stay with them for life.

Watch our new Credit Café video below, where we discuss financial education in primary schools

Indeed, children are likely to get their first mobile phone by the age of eight and begin online shopping by the age of 10.  So we can see it’s increasingly important to help children better understand the value of money at the earliest opportunity.

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Leaving the bank of mum and dad: the challenges

Young people are often keen to break away and get financially independent, but in doing so there are many financial responsibilities & challenges they might have to deal with.

With student loans and overdrafts taking years to pay off, just how long can young people realistically keep milking the Bank of Mum and Dad?

Signs that you might be ready for financial independence
Sometimes it’s just about being able to rein yourself in when you really, really want to splash out on something you don’t need and can’t really afford, like a luxury item you know you can do without, or a pretty framed picture you’ll have forgotten about minutes after you’ve left the shop. Continue reading

Helping the young to develop vital money skills

It's never too early to learn about good finance tips

It’s never too early to learn about good finance tips

My Money Week, which runs from 8-14 June, is a national activity week for primary and secondary schools which aims to help young people gain the skills, knowledge and confidence in money matters they’ll need to thrive in today’s society.

It’s the brainchild of the Personal Finance Education Group (pfeg), which helps teach children to understand money and how to manage it.

For the past two years Experian has partnered with pfeg on a project to help primary school children improve vital money skills.  In this time, the project has transformed numerous primary schools around the country into national Centres of Excellence for financial education, helping more than 12,000 pupils, parents and teachers improve their money skills. Continue reading