Tag Archives: how to improve credit score

5 things to know about registering to vote

Are you registered to vote in the UK? Yesterday Prime Minister Theresa May announced a General Election to take place on 8 June. To be eligible to vote, it’s likely you’ll need to register by midnight Monday 22 May. And did you know that being on the Electoral Roll could also help improve your credit score?

Here are five things you should know about registering to vote:

1.            How registering to vote could help improve your credit score. It’s important that your credit report includes your Electoral Roll details, as lenders use this information to help confirm your name, address and where you’ve lived before. This info usually has to be up to date before they are willing to offer a mortgage, a loan or any other form of financial account. Continue reading

What is a good credit score?

A good credit score

A “good” credit score depends on the scoring system used by your particular lender – there’s no one credit score or magic number – different lenders score differently.

However, if you have a good credit score from one of the main credit reporting agencies such as Experian, you are likely to have a good credit score with your lender.

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  • The Experian Credit Score runs from 0-999 and is an indication of how lenders may view you.
  • It is based on the information in your Experian Credit Report
  • The higher your score, the greater the chance you have of getting the best credit deals

To get your Experian Credit Score FREE forever, sign up to CreditMatcher, a free independent service that helps you compare credit deals you’re more likely to get, based on your credit information.  We are a credit broker not a lender, working with selected lenders.†*

Credit score bands

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Remortgaging: how can I improve my credit score?

Many homeowners may find that once that their deal comes to an end, their interest rate and mortgage payments may well go up. This could be a good time to check out whether you can re-mortgage and get a lower rate elsewhere.

In this case you are generally going to be taking out a mortgage which is the same size as the one you already had. Your monthly payments may be higher or lower than you currently pay, depending on the mortgage you go for. Alternatively, you may just want the stability of a fixed rate, if you’ve been on a variable rate that you think may fluctuate.

It can take a few months to process a mortgage application, so it’s best not to wait until your current deal ends before you start looking around. Watch our new #AskExperian video to find out what some of the options are.

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Ask James: latest credit questions answered here

Every month Experian’s James Jones answers a selection of your questions about credit and fraud in his ‘ask the experts’ style column here.

Among the new questions, there is Should a default still be showing on my credit report?, about an old default that was due to disappear.

There is also a query about car finance and credit scoring,  Will voluntary termination of car finance affect my credit score?, and another relating to a debt relief order, Why is my debt relief order still affecting my credit rating?.

You can also find archived Ask James questions arranged under subject headings such as ‘applying for credit’, ‘credit and debt’ and ‘fraud’ at the main Ask James page.

If you have a specific question and can’t find an answer here or you wish to contact us to query something on your credit report, please use our customer service contact form.

Watch James talk to Experian Experts blogger Darren about retirement and your credit report.

Grow your credit score if you’re moving to or from the UK

By Neil Stone, Experian UK Social Support team

If you have recently moved to the UK, or moved back after a spell abroad, you may be wondering what you can do to start to grow your Experian Credit Score. 

You may even be looking to spread your wings and move abroad, and wondering how this will impact your score.

Due to the differences in data protection laws between countries we are some way off having a “global” credit score, we at Experian in the UK only hold information relating to individuals at UK addresses and so moving to or from a new country will mean starting your credit history afresh.

We’ve put together some tips on what you can do to get started on building your credit history.

If you’re…..moving to the UK for the first time
Firstly, you will need to start building your credit history.  For those that have moved from another EU country, then the first step to take would be to register on the electoral roll.

EU citizens can vote in EU elections, and registering at your current address on the voters roll will help when you apply for credit, as lenders often use this to help confirm the ID of their applicant.  You can find out more about registering to vote at www.aboutmyvote.co.uk

If you are not able to register to on the electoral roll, you can add a note to your credit report (once you have obtained a copy of your credit report) to explain this, called a Notice Of Correction.

Many banks now share information relating to current accounts with overdrafts, so speaking to your bank about such an account could be the next step towards building up your credit history.

As your accounts become more established, lenders will be able to use the information to help make their lending decisions.

If you’re…..moving back to the UK
We hold information on closed accounts for six years, so when moving back from a spell abroad there may still be information on your credit report, depending on how long you have been away.

To check for any old information, make sure you supply your old UK address in your application when it asks for a previous address.

If you’re …..moving to another country from the UK ~
As information on your UK credit report is for use within the UK only, we can’t supply your UK credit report to any countries outside of the UK.

If you are moving abroad, you may want to get a copy of your credit report to take with you when you go. This way you would be able to provide a potential lender with your UK credit report yourself should they wish to see it.

The Experian Credit Score is a guide to help you understand your credit report, and how the way you’ve managed the credit you’ve had in the past might affect applications you’re making now. For more information on how to improve your Experian Credit Score, here are our top 5 tips.

Experian Credit Score top tip 5 of 5: Review your credit report regularly

tip 5 - 600x300Everyone has an Experian Credit Score. Looking after it, nurturing, growing and improving it can help you get a better rate on loans, credit card or mortgages.

Reviewing your credit report can help you look after your finances better. The data & information held there summarises your credit history, so it can be worth reviewing it on a regular basis, and making sure it provides an accurate and up-to-date picture of your credit histories.

Video: 5 top tips to improve your Experian Credit Score

Lenders usually check your credit report when you apply for financial products, as it helps them decide whether to offer you the product and which terms to set, such as interest rates. Continue reading

Experian Credit Score top tip #4 of 5: Register to vote at your current address

tip 4 - 600x300Everyone has an Experian Credit Score. Looking after it, nurturing, growing and improving it can help you get a better rate on loans, credit card or mortgages.

Lenders use the electoral register to help confirm who you are and where you live.  This info usually has to be up to date before they are willing to offer a mortgage, a loan or any other form of financial account.

Watch video: How registering to vote can boost your credit rating

Being on the Electoral Roll makes it easier for banks and financial institutions to confirm your identity and not being registered will reduce your Experian Credit Score.

Not being registered could cause a delay when you apply for credit, while the lenders confirm your details some other way. With some lenders it may even hurt the credit score they give you, and some applications may even be turned down. Continue reading

Experian Credit Score top tip #3 of 5: Set up direct debit payments

tip 3  - 600x300Everyone has an Experian Credit Score. Looking after it, nurturing, growing and improving it can help you get a better rate on loans, credit card or mortgages.

If you apply for new credit, and lenders see late or missed payments on credit agreements with other lenders, they may be concerned that you will miss payments to them too. Continue reading

Experian Credit Score top tip #2 of 5: Space out credit applications

tip 2 - 600x300Everyone has an Experian Credit Score. Looking after it, nurturing, growing and improving it can help you get a better rate on loans, credit card or mortgages.

A scattergun approach to making credit applications, even if you see it as just shopping around, can have a negative impact on your Experian Credit Score.

When you apply for credit, a ‘credit search’ is recorded on your report. Numerous credit applications can suggest you are over-reliant on credit to supplement your income. Continue reading

Experian Credit Score top tip #1 of 5: stay within credit limits

tip 1 - 600x300Everyone has an Experian Credit Score. Looking after it, nurturing, growing and improving it can help you get a better rate on loans, credit card or mortgages.

Do try to stay within your credit limits and do try to pay your credit bills on time. Missed or late payments stay on your credit report for at least six years, and this can have a big impact on your score. Continue reading